Skip to main content

About your Search

20131101
20131130
STATION
MSNBCW 25
MSNBC 20
CSPAN 15
CSPAN2 15
COM 6
KQED (PBS) 4
CNNW 2
WETA 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 98
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)
and brown nomination and then cloture vote on the motion to proceed to enda. police officer michael carney fought for two and a half dwreers get his job back and he won. after he took medical leave of absence, the springfield officials refused to reinstate him because a veteran police officer had revealed he was gay. but officer carney was determined to return to the force. because he lives in mass marks one of only 1 states that protect employees against discrimination based on sexual orientation or general identity, officer carney is now back on the job serving and protecting the people of springfield, massachusetts. i'm also pleased to say nevada law also includes robust protections against this type of discrimination. officer carney testified before the house of representatives in 2007 and shared his story. mr. president, this is what he said: "i'm god cop. i've lost two and a half years of employment, fighting to get that job back because i'm gay. i never would have been able to do that had i not lived in massachusetts or in one of the handful of other states that protect employees fr
something about how obviously right enda is? the debate that we are having in the senate today is about whether we should ensure that lgbt americans don't suffer discrimination in the workplace. i have long been a supporter of enda, and enacting it into law is something that we should have done a long time ago. in fact, 17 years ago it came within one vote of passing in the senate. making enda law will be the next significant step in the fight for equality for lgbt americans. after decades of struggle, we have achieved a number of huge victories in rapid succession. ending don't ask, don't tell. overturning the federal ban on same-sex marriage recognition. the achievement of marriage equality in more and more of our states, including my home state of minnesota. while we are debating enda in the senate today, equality in the workplace is in fact something we achieved in minnesota over two decades ago. in 19193, the minnesota state legislature amended our state's museum rights act to protect minnesota's workers from discrimination based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. at t
to the floor to speak on enda earlier this week, senator kirk noted the importance of a senator from his home state of illinois, being in a position of leadership on this civil rights issue, this really is an historic opportunity, and when the senate votes on final passage of the employment nondiscrimination act tomorrow, i hope we all will take advantage of this historic opportunity. thank you. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from arkansas. mr. merkley: i so much appreciate the comments of my colleague from delaware, first speaking to the importance of rebuilding our manufacturing sector, of creating living wage jobs, how important that is to building the middle class, providing the foundation for families to thrive, and then speaking to the core issue we're debating today, that of ending significant discrimination against millions of american citizens. the words were well-spoken, i say to the senator from delaware. thank you for your advocacy that will make this nation work better for so many of our fellow citizen
attempt at an antidiscrimination law failed. the the enda act has advanced in the senate after mark kirk made a dramatic return to the floor law. >> i have been silent to the last two years due to a stroke - a little under two years ago. i have risen to speak because i believe so passionately in enacting the enda statue. it is appropriate for illinois republicans to speak on behalf of this measure. in the true decision of abraham lincoln and dirkon, the men who gave us the civil rights act >> good to see the senator doing better. we have founder and president of an organization dedicated to ending workplace scrim nation, and a military veteran who sued the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms based on her gender identity. you were hired by the atf pending a background check. what happened? >> good evening, thanks for having me on. originally i was a police detective. i was recruited - my last assignment i worked hand to hand with apf. i was recruited for a civilian position, doing the same job i was doing, but in their san francisco field office. during that time i left the department
the house passed a version of enda introduced by congressman frank, but the bill made no progress in the snavment today there are 55 cosponsors of enda in the senate, democrats and republicans representing the broad majority support for the bill, signaling that tremendous progress has been made. it is all the more shameful that it has taken us this long to arrive at this day because americans believe in equality. according to one survey, some 80% of americans believe that it is already illegal to discriminate against workers based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. unfortunately, however, this is one of the rare instances where the american people are giving congress way too much credit because the truth is, we haven't acted yet. and the consequences of congressional inaction remain all too real for millions of lgbt americans. despite the successful efforts in many states to pass nondiscrimination measures, americans living in over half the country can still be discriminated against in the workplace based on sexual orientation or gender identity. and it happens. betwe
. >>> where will enda end up? >>> the start of this sunday morning in mid-november, we're thinking a lot about rights. the senate passed a bill thursday that would make it illegal to fire someone for being gay. whether it will actually become law is an open question, but the roots of this bill go back a lot farther than you might think, more on that in just a moment. democracy means every political office is open to anyone. and philadelphia last week, a member of the whig party was not only on the ballot, he won. he'll be here on the show, a realelected whig. we're excited about that. laws across country are making voting a lot harder. in texas, in addition to wendy davis, a man named jim wright was told he didn't have the correct paperwork to vote last week. used to be the speaker of the house. we'll be talking about that. also, secession. a new kind of secession, not from the united states, but from individual states. people who want to be americans but think they're trapped in the wrong state. there are now some secession movements like that in the u.s. right now. do any of them stand a cha
of discrimination is subtle. it broke my heart when i watched the senate fall one vote shy of passing enda back in the 1990's. i hope the senator remembers what it used to be like and fights to pass enda today. well, i do remember and i do know what this -- that this bill will help stop discrimination in the workplace. the bill is simple. it says a person cannot be denied employment because of who that person is, gay, straight or transgender. the bill provides no special privilege, no special privilege. it creates no quota, it creates no exemption from the codes of conduct or anything else. it does not allow inappropriate conduct in the workplace. in fact, the bill is narrower than title seven protections in certain respects. in my view, the bill does provide critical employment protections, and it's long past the time that it be signed into law. three years ago, we recognized that a person's merit, not sexual orientation, is what matters for service in the military. the point is no different in this bill. if a person wants to be a ballistics expert, a police officer, a firefighter, a bank tell
into the tartar sauce lifestyle. now luckily this enda bill applies only to companies with 15 or more employees so you're safe for now 14 bigots moving and storage. (laughter) now folks, if you think, if you are's saying to yourself oh t won't affect my workplace, folks you're dead wrong. as the american family association warns, rest rooms and locker rooms could become landmines for disputes and disturbances. an anatomically male employee who claims a female gender identity might be able to demand access to the women's rest room. now folks it's already started here in new york city.x6 this is true, an all gender rest room symbol. look at this you got a guy, you got a girl, the next one over there is already sporting a boner and-- (laughter) and the one on this end is in some sort of crazy sex swing. no way i could pee in there. i would get stage fright. now folks it is a nightmare for employers. as the family research council counsels, enda would force religious business owners and workplaces such as christian book stores to accept as normal transvestite and drag queens. oh yeah. it is well-known
for enda, the employment nondiscrimination act. this bill is about basic fairness and it's really about the golden rule -- treating others as you would like to be treated. every single american should have the right to earn a living and provide for his or her family without fearing discrimination in the workplace because of who they are and whom they love. americans like marty edwards, an assistant vice president at the first national bank of grandbury, texas, whose story was recently featured in "the advocate." marty was passed over for promotions at work despite a very strong 11-year history at the bank. when he asked for an explanation from his vice president and human relations department, he was told that the workers who had received the promotion were -- quote -- "a better fit for the image we are looking f for." now, marty edwards had been hired by the bank right out of college. he formed his professional identity there. he was moving up the ladder until he came out as a gay man. when edwards asked whether his sexual orientation was the main reason he had been denied promotions,
objection. mr. toomey: i rise to speak on an amendment to the enda bill which we're going to vote on soon. this is an amendment i offered on my own behalf and that of senator flake and senator mccain. and i thank them. it occurs to me that sometimes in our work a tension can arise between important competing american values. and two vitally important american values i think are somewhat intentioned in some aspects of this bill. first, one great enduring and important value for all americans is equality. and this bill today clearly makes a strong stand for greater equality. i believe, and i think most americans share the view that every individual is entitled to dignity and respect and fairness and that individuals ought to be judged based on their merits, on their character and on their abilities. a person's sexual orientation is irrelevant to their ability to be a good doctor or engineer or athlete or a federal judge. and that's why i've supported acknowledging that reality. i supported 17 years ago in the writing of the charter of the city government of allentown, a provision that would
non-d discrimination act, known as enda. making it illegal to hire on the basis of sexual orientation and identity. in an email to supporters senator corey booker says: >> the obama administration along with 55 democratic senators support it. however, it would have many hurdles in the house where speak e-john boehner opposes the measure. a spokesperson for john boehner says he believes it is frivolous legislation and will cost jobs. john boehner and house republicans say existing measures provide protection from discrimination. >> if it doesn't pass we'll live to fight another day. it will pass eventually. the american people are changing. the country is challenging. >> the last time enda was put before the senate was 1996, when it lost by a vote. advocates say they are getting closer to its passage. >> current federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, race and national origin. it does not stop an employer from firing or refusing to hire workers because they are gay, bisexual or transgender or les bian. >> another chilly start to the northern part of the united states.
on cultural issues is turning off voters. in a statement, the family research council says, enda would transfer the workplace into an environment in which certain self identifications and conduct must be given special privileges by employers and in which any moral opposition would be expressed. it includes exemption for schools and churches caught in the middle, house speaker john boehner who says he is against enda on the grounds it will lead to more lawsuits and hurt small businesses. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thank you for being here. >> until boehner changes course, the white house and democrats will keep the pressure on. >> some of the objections that i have heard from members in the house are recommeminisce he want opponents of other civil rights legislation put forward and they were wrong them, and they are wrong now. this is the right thing to do. >> in a statement, president obama praised the senate while blasting house republicans for standtion in the way of what he calls historic legislation. mike viquera, the white house. >> this is how many americans would b
our law now for almost a half a century. enda, the legislation before us, would expand that to sexual orientation and gender identity. the civil rights act of 1964 has worked. it has worked. it has provided an enforcement mechanism for those who have been discriminated against in their employment because of their race or because of their religion or because of their national origin or because of their sex. it has worked. enda would expand that protection for sexual orientation and gender identity. it's time that we do this. 21 states have already acted, including my state of maryland. we passed laws, 17 states include gender identity. federalism has worked. what do i mean by that? we have seen that there's a national law. the law is the civil rights act of 1964. it set up the framework, so everyone understands we won't tolerate discrimination in the workplace. and it's had a workable way where those who are victimized can get remedied because the real remedy we want is equal opportunity for employment of all the citizens of this country. it has worked. our states have said we can go f
on the employment nondiscrimination act or enda, which would add sexual identity to the list of discriminations prohibited by law. >> this legislation would pass by a nice margin in the house if the speaker would allow it. i can't understand what's doing on in the house of representatives. >> neither can i. republican senator susan collins, a co-sponsor of the bill said her constituents were often shocked when they learned no such federal nondiscrimination law existed. they will continue to be shocked. earlier this month the increasingly radical group heritage action called the legislation unnecessary and warned house republicans it would be scoring their vote saying that the bill would actually do harm to many american civil liberties and religious freedoms. it is a strange, twisted piece of logic but nonetheless echoed hours ago by indiana senator dan coats. >> i discourage discrimination of any kind, individuals or institutions for their faith and values. i feel it's vital for this body to stand up for our country's long stand ing right to the freedom of religion and speech. >> the house may
and more difficult to really get the momentum, to get the bill to be pushed, and the advocates of enda are hoping that this senate vote can do that. >> congressman, even though the supreme court struck down doma, the defense of marriage act on june 26th, there is still members of the national guard who are being discriminated against. in fact, there are nine states which refuse to comply with the supreme court ruling against doma. and the secretary of defense put those states on notice last night. take a listen. >> everyone who serves our country in uniform, everyone in this country, should receive all the benefits they deserve, and they have earned and in accordance with the law. everyone's rights must be protected. >> congressman, secretary hagel also says he's ready to take further action to bring those nine red states into compliance. what do you think of that? >> well, it's the directive from their military leader. they should follow it. and make sure that we don't discriminate in the national guard. so i'm hopeful. in fact, very hopeful that will happen. i think it's important to
and is expected to pass enda, a bill that bans employers from discriminating against gays, bisexual, and transgendered people. but while the senate vote is historic, the bill may not ever get a vote in the house of representatives. house speaker john boehner has previously said he's opposed to taking up the legislation. before today's vote that's happening right now, senators called on the house to act. >> let the house vote on it. i am convinced if the house votes on this, it will pass the house and go to the president for his signature. >> speaker boehner, please, please do what is right for the american people. >> nearly every time the senate passes a bill, it's like we're banishing the issue to a faraway jail and speaker boehner's the prison warden. >> nbc's luke russert is on capitol hill. so luke, what kind of pressure are senate republicans able, if any, to put on house republicans and ultimately get speaker boehner to do something here? >> reporter: not much, tamron. because this bill enda, it falls in that same area as the comprehensive bipartisan immigration bill did. reme
known as enda and it would make it illegal to terminate employment based on sexual discrimination or gender identity. but as of monday, after die manager the u.s. senate in '96 and 2001 and again in 2007, it's looking like enda may finally have the 60 votes it needs to pass. of course it faces a tougher road in the house. but the senate support would still be a significant step for national leadership on the issue of lgbt equality, which is why, in my terror alert week, i want to ask one of the senate's most visible leaders and one of enda's most vocal critics to reconsider. dear senator john mccain, it's me, melissa. i have to say i'm a little disappointed. you've been one of the loudest voices of reasonable republicanism amid the insanity swirling around your side of the aisle lately. it was a bit of a letdown when i saw that you've taken a decidedly unreasonable stance on workplace equality. when asked about the concerns that you could stop you from voting yes on enda, you said, "whether it imposes quotas, whether it has reverse discrimination, whether it has the kinds of provi
of this country. we can't leave anyone behind. >> brown: "enda," or the "employment non-discrimination act," bans employers from using sexual orientation or gender identity to discriminate in hiring and employment. the bill cleared a key procedural hurdle monday evening, marking a turnaround from 1996. >> the aye's are 49, the no's are 50. the bill is not agreed to. >> brown: then, a similar measure failed in the senate by a single vote. that same year, congress adopted "doma," the "defense of marriage act," barring federal recognition of same-sex marriage. 17 years later, the u.s. supreme court has overturned "doma," more states are legalizing same- sex marriage and polls find the american public increasingly accepting of gay rights. >> i think we'll finish enda this week. and there's been good work on both sides. there's been trust, which is so very, very important. >> brown: senate majority leader harry reid and his fellow democrats are unanimous in supporting the employment discrimination bill. a majority of senate republicans are opposed, although none spoke today. it remains unclear if the
is exactly the reason we need enda in the first place. it's also why transgender awareness week, which kicks off this monday, provides an important opportunity to break down these barriers. joining me now is laverne cox, star of the netflix series "orange is the new black" and first transwoman of color to have a leading role on a mainstream scripted television show. i'm so glad to have you here. >> so excited to be here. >> so exciting. it was a big week. a lot happened that i thought was really positive. i want to start with enda because obviously we know it passed in the senate. and the belief is it could pass in the house except john boehner is going to play a little trick like he did with the continuing resolution and just not bring it to the floor. and the thing that strikes me is the gop just does not get they are on the wrong side of history on this one. >> it's a shame. you know, i get to live my dream out by having my dream job basically. so many transpeople are denied that opportunity. i just met a young transwoman in kansas city, missouri, this week who got up and told us a story
't be covered. and i'm wondering, the senate is going to do its first test vote on enda. but the question is will it -- what will happen in the house? what do you think the prospects are in the house? >> let me just say on that subject, as with shutting down government as opening it up as with the immigration bill as with 95% of -- at least 95% of the democrats are on the legislation and will vote for the legislation. so we only need 10% of the republicans with 95% of the democrats to pass enda in the house. on so many pieces of legislation, overwhelming democratic votes are there for background checks and the gun violence issue. immigration. >> right. >> and opening government and the rest. so we just need a small number of republicans. if these bills were brought to the floor, they would pass. we have five republicans on the enda bill. we have 193 of which five are problems. then we have ten more votes in addition to that on the democratic side. so all we need is maybe 20 republicans and we can pass the bill. >> this point that you make about this question as to -- i think this is maybe
congresswoman sanchez on four or five months ago and i said then and i believe it to be the case, now with enda, as well, getting past, molly, getting past the most of the filing deadlines, next spring and summer, that these two issues may well come to the floor so that the speaker doesn't have to put republicans in danger of being primaried but once the filing deadlines are closed, they're freer to bringing the things to the floor but just quickly, you showed a quinnipiac poll. another part of that is asking who do you trust more on these four issues. health care, economics, the economy, immigration and the budget. and in all four of those, the question was, the president or republicans in congress. all four of those they were substantially tied within one point one way or the other so the fact is that we are headed down a path both from the white house and from capitol hill where people are completely losing trust in the organizations of the government. we've got to get that fixed. >> molly, last question to you. to that point, you know, i mean, i get the politics of waiting until after filin
in the house in 2007 it did not move in the senate. on november 7, the u.s. senate made history by passing enda. it is time for the house to act, pass enda and pass protections to end employer discriminations. for the sake of dignity, and equality, let us vote. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. higgins: orally administered cancer drugs are becoming the new standard of care as opposed to i.v. given chemo they arity pi drugs. unfortunately, insurance policies have not kept pace with the science. typically, inch v. chemotherapy is covered as a medical benefit while oral chemotherapy is covered under the prescription drug component this creates a disparity in coverage and a financial disincentive to choose oral a chemotherapy. cancer patients should choose a course of treatment based on what they and their doctor believe will work best. that's why i introduced the cancer drug coverage parity act that
on this enthusiasm on a lot of folks supporting enda have, saying the house will not move on this. they view it as something that would allow for frivolous lawsuits that would hurt small business. they've said a this a lot, that house republicans are saying, there is not anything new. we oppose this legislation, not based on the actual people that will be affected, but because what it could do it to business. specifically those involved in religious community that oppose gay marriage and gay rights, also as hertage action that very strong outside conservative group which said they would score the vote if you voted for enda, you would be infringing on the individual liberties of businesses to carry out how they want to carry out their practices. this is something that will face a death in the house gop confidence, much like a lot of these controversial bills have come out of the senate, things like immigration. what's very interesting tamron. back in 2007, this passed the house with 35 republican votes. republican charlie dent of pennsylvania, a moderate said he wished if -- go forward on hou
indicated this morning he would support the employment nondiscrimination act known as enda. his vote would mean the bill may now have the 60 votes required to overcome any obstruction tactic. joining us now, richard blumenthal of con. first things first, the vote is scheduled for a few minutes from now. are you confident it passes? >> i'm very optimistic. and, in fact, confident with senator heller's support. we now have the critical number of republicans. the real battle now is probably going to be in the house. and my hope is that speaker boehner will very simply allow a vote to occur, much as he did with the violence against women act, where there was clearly support among republicans. and i believe there is enough support in the house, as there is in the senate, for this measure to be approved. and it is historic. it is important, profoundly significant to the nation, to be inclusive in banning discrimination in the workplace. >> and senator, you're right, it is a long time coming and i think a lot of people are not even aware, necessarily, this is not already in law. but speaker boehn
nondiscrimination act referred to as enda, workplace based on age, religion, despite last two decades similar legislation for sexual orientation and gender identity never successful. is congress ready to take that step? senator tammy baldwin of wisconsin, first openly gay member of the senate. senator, we appreciate joining us. i want to ask you, final vote to pass this legislation. obviously this seems at this point to remain an uphill climb specifically in the house. so what do you say directly to speaker boehner whose own spokesperson says, and here are the exact words, the speaker believes this legislation will increase frivolous litigation and cost american jobs, especially small business jobs. >> what i would say to speaker boehner is this is about america's core and fundamental values, freedom, fairness and opportunity. it's so much in the american tradition that people be judged by their work ethic, by their talents, by the skills that qualify them for a job rather than sexual orientation or gender identity. that's what i would say on the substantive side. on the procedural, i would s
non-discrimination act, enda, marks the first major movement in nearly two decades on legislation aimed at barring employers from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. a similar measure failed by one vote in the senate back in 1996. >> let the bells of freedom ring! >> reporter: today, supporters celebrated a markedly different outcome, 64 to 32. democrat jeff merkley of oregon: >> the senate has clearly spoken to end discrimination in the workplace. we have fought to capture that vision of equality and liberty and opportunity and fairness embedded in our founding documents and in our founding vision. we've taken a huge stride today in that direction. >> reporter: ten republicans and two independents joined all 52 democrats who voted in passing the measure. only republicans voted no. republican opponents mostly stayed silent over three days of debate, but today indiana's dan coats warned the bill could encroach on the religious beliefs of some employers. >> so there's two types of discrimination here that we're dealing with, and one of those goes to
'll be more headlines on the affordable care act. potential votes on enda and the minimum wage. sunday forecasters today, jonathan capehart. jackie kucinich. thanks to you both for joining me today. >> thanks, karen. >> i want to start with you, jonathan. you've got chris christie. he's looking to 2016 even if he won't admit he's talking to 2016. it seems as though there's this dynamic if you listen to what he said and others said. there's this inside/outside washington, i'm not of washington. then you've got the sort of sarah palin, ted cruz sort of establishment, nonestablishment dynamic. what's going on with the gop? >> i wish i knew. i think a lot of people within the gop wish they knew what was going on. look, chris christie is -- he is an outsider by washington standards. he's governor. he's clearly outside of washington. he's actually getting things done. they're not getting anything done in washington. yet he's also someone who is -- he is a conservative. but by the republican party standards right now, he can be viewed as a moderate. and someone as we saw by his landslide elec
career path from the music industry to advocate in the lgbt field. >> enda, its passage would make it illegal for an employer to discriminate in employment on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. democratic senator cory booker said, it's the kind of shocking discrimination, the employment nondiscrimination act which would make serious strides towards bringing our lives into harmony with shared american values. the obama administration along with 55 democratic senators support it, however it would have many hurdles in the house where spieker john boehner opposes the measure. cost american jobs especially small business jobs. boehner and house republicans say that existing measures already provide the needed protection from discrimination. >> well, we just live to fight another day. it will pass eventually. the american people are changing. this country is changing. we are definitely tbkin becoming more inclusive. >> advocates say they are getting closer and closer to its passage. al jazeera new york. >>> millions of people head to the polls tomorrow for election day
a crime and the reduced. i don't know who might others who knew. if in doubt to anyone on enda nice and cool ones who put in getting both of these debates should be encouraged to school for a vibrant high score in the elections shows that these support as a political figure goes well beyond the jewish community can only be me. i didn't want to mix religion and state of war religion and politics. my practice as a running inside the jewish community in my jewish identity is important one as a citizen plus argentina is one of the most wonderful countries in the world in terms of integration of religions traditions and of different cultures and their places in the world where people kill each other because of matters of religion in their argentina. i would say there is no violence and killing in the name of religion for the weekend his blood traces in the writing mainly from the jewish community linked to the governing body of the time in general welcome the fact that the rabbi is not representative. it is now up to rabbi berman to make its voice heard as a member of parliament. this i
is november 30th. get out and shop small. >>> where will enda end up? >>> the start of this sunday morning in mid-november, we're thinking a lot about rights. the senate passed a bill thursday that would make it illegal to fire someone for being gay. whether it will actually become law is an open question, but the roots of this bill go back a lot farther than you might think, more on that in just a moment. democracy means every political office is open to anyone. and philadelphia last week, a member of the whig party was not only on the ballot, he won.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)